This is the documentation for CDH 4.7.1.
Documentation for other versions is available at Cloudera Documentation.

Upgrading Oozie

Follow these instructions to upgrade Oozie to CDH4 from RPM or Debian Packages.

  Note: Before you start:

Make sure there are no workflows in RUNNING or SUSPENDED status; otherwise the database upgrade will fail and you will have to reinstall Oozie CDH3 to complete or kill those running workflows.

Upgrading Oozie from CDH3 to CDH4

To upgrade Oozie from CDH3 to CDH4, back up the configuration files and database, uninstall the CDH3 version and then install and configure the CDH4 version. Proceed as follows.

  Note:

If you have already performed the steps to uninstall CDH3 and all components, as described under Upgrading from CDH3 to CDH4, you can skip Step 1 below and proceed with installing the new CDH4 version of Oozie.

  Note:

Important: Ubuntu and Debian upgrades

When you uninstall CDH3 Oozie on Ubuntu and Debian systems, the contents of /var/lib/oozie are removed, leaving a bare directory. This can cause the Oozie upgrade to CDH4 to fail. To prevent this, either copy the database files to another location and restore them after the uninstall, or recreate them after the uninstall. Make sure you do this before starting the re-install.

Step 1: Remove Oozie

  1. Back up the Oozie configuration files in /etc/oozie and the Oozie database. For convenience you may want to save Oozie configuration files in your home directory; you will need them after installing the new version of Oozie.
  2. Stop the Oozie Server.

    To stop the Oozie Server:

    sudo service oozie stop
  3. Uninstall Oozie.

    To uninstall Oozie, run the appropriate command on each host:

    • On Red Hat-compatible systems:
    $ sudo yum remove oozie-client
    • On SLES systems:
    $ sudo zypper remove  oozie-client 
    • On Ubuntu or Debian systems:
    sudo apt-get purge oozie-client
      Warning:

    If you are upgrading an Ubuntu or Debian system from CDH3u3 or earlier, you must use apt-get purge (rather than apt-get remove) to make sure the re-install succeeds, but be aware that apt-get purge removes all your configuration data. If you have modified any configuration files, DO NOT PROCEED before backing them up.

Step 2: Install Oozie

Follow the procedure under Installing Oozie and then proceed to Configuring Oozie after Upgrading from CDH3. For packaging information, see Oozie Packaging.

  Important:

During uninstall, the package manager renames any configuration files you have modified from <file> to <file>.rpmsave. During re-install, the package manager creates a new <file> with applicable defaults. You are responsible for applying any changes captured in the original CDH3 configuration file to the new CDH4 configuration file. In the case of Ubuntu and Debian upgrades, a file will not be installed if there is already a version of that file on the system, and you will be prompted to resolve conflicts; for details, see Automatic handling of configuration files by dpkg.

Upgrading Oozie from an Earlier CDH4 Release to the Latest CDH4 Release

The steps that follow assume you are upgrading Oozie as part of an overall upgrade to the latest CDH4 release and have already performed the steps under Upgrading from an Earlier CDH4 Release.

To upgrade Oozie to the latest CDH4 release, proceed as follows.

Step 1: Back Up the Configuration

Back up the Oozie configuration files in /etc/oozie and the Oozie database.

For convenience you may want to save Oozie configuration files in your home directory; you will need them after installing the new version of Oozie.

Step 2: Stop the Oozie Server.

To stop the Oozie Server:

sudo service oozie stop

Step 3: Install Oozie

Follow the procedure under Installing Oozie and then proceed to Configuring Oozie after Upgrading from an Earlier CDH4 Release.

  Important:

During package upgrade, the package manager renames any configuration files you have modified from <file> to <file>.rpmsave, and creates a new <file> with applicable defaults. You are responsible for applying any changes captured in the original configuration file to the new configuration file. In the case of Ubuntu and Debian upgrades, you will be prompted if you have made changes to a file for which there is a new version; for details, see Automatic handling of configuration files by dpkg.